Advanced Technology – Division 8

Researcher in microelectronics laboratoryThe Advanced Technology Division performs research and development on component and subsystem-level technologies that can enable new approaches to Department of Defense (DoD) systems and that advance the state of the art for U.S. industry. The division's expertise covers a wide front including chemistry, computer science, device physics, integrated circuit design and fabrication, lithography, materials, nanofabrication, optics, optoelectronics, packaging, photonics, quantum information systems, and radio-frequency technology. The Advanced Technology Division strives to understand DoD systems and develops technologies that "will make a difference."

Groups


Group 81—Chemical, Microsystem, and Nanoscale Technologies
The Chemical, Microsystem, and Nanoscale Technologies Group combines chemistry, optics, photonics, microfluidics, and nanofabrication disciplines, enabling the development of new technologies in the areas of chemical-biological defense, diagnostic and forensic analysis, and sensors and signal processors. The work includes the design, development, and testing of chemical sensors for trace explosive and toxic chemical detection (both point and standoff); multifunctional microsystems combining sensing, actuation, and energy sources; and the design, fabrication, and demonstration of metamaterials, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices, and microfluidic components. 

Group 82—Laser Technology and Applications
The Laser Technology and Applications Group develops application-specific solid-state lasers, semiconductor lasers, and beam control and diagnostics for high-energy laser systems. Examples of research activities include creating cryogenic-laser-based illuminators for sensor applications, demonstrating wavelength and coherent laser-beam-combining techniques for scaling fiber amplifier and semiconductor laser arrays to higher brightness, and developing a ground terminal for an advanced NASA laser experiment to a moon-orbiting satellite. These activities span the range from epitaxial growth of semiconductor laser materials and demonstrating innovative laser devices in the laboratory to designing and field-testing complete optical systems.

Group 86—RF Technology
The RF Technology Group develops and demonstrates innovative radio-frequency (RF) technologies and integrated subsystems as solutions to emerging national security needs in radar, electronic warfare, signals intelligence (SIGINT), and special communications. To execute its RF research and development mission, the group develops and tests custom antennas, transmit/receive modules, multichannel wideband receiver-exciters, beamformers, active and passive RF circuits, wide bandgap/GaN materials and devices, low-phase-noise oscillators, high-speed software-defined radios, and high-throughput digital processing architectures. Novel RF solutions are developed at the device level up through the full RF subsystem level, with an emphasis on highly integrated, small-form-factor RF subsystems. The group collaboratively interacts with research groups across the Laboratory to take projects from initial concept stage, through simulation and analysis, to design and prototyping, and finally to field demonstration.

Group 87—Advanced Imager Technology
The Advanced Imager Technology Group performs research and development of imager devices and subsystem-level technology for the DoD and scientific community. The imager efforts include advanced silicon-based and compound semiconductor-based focal-plane technologies for applications such as ground- and space-based surveillance, adaptive optics, and astronomy. These focal planes address special requirements, for example, large-format gigapixel arrays, very-high-speed imagers (100 ps exposures), time-of-arrival detectors (LADAR receiver), and low-light-level imaging applications. World-class charge-coupled-device (CCD) imagers fabricated by this group have been used in a variety of high-end scientific applications, for example, focal planes for the Chandra X-ray telescope and other preeminent astronomical observatories. The group's efforts span the range of device and materials development, integrated circuit design and fabrication, custom packaging, detector hybridization, and the development of control and readout electronics for system-level demonstrations.

Group 89—Quantum Information and Integrated Nanosystems Group
The Quantum Information and Integrated Nanosystems Group conducts quantum information science research from a shared foundation of innovative control-signal design, outstanding fabrication tools, and well-equipped measurement infrastructure. The group has a broad range of experimental and prototyping activities. The group's quantum information science activities include the development of superconducting and trapped-ion qubits and quantum sensing with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. In addition, the group has robust capabilities in classical superconducting circuits, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) design and fabrication, and integrated photonics. These component technologies are used in synergy with quantum information science demonstrations, as well as in standalone applications that include beyond-CMOS circuit technologies, energy-starved sensors, compact optical communication and laser radar transceivers, and microwave photonic signal processing.

 

 

top of page