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Probabilistic Threat Propagation for Malicious Activity Detection(277.31 KB)

Date:
May 26, 2013
Published in:
Proceedings of ICASSP 2013, Vancouver, B.C.
Type:
Conference Paper

Summary

In this paper, we present a method for detecting malicious activity within networks of interest. We leverage prior community detection work by propagating threat probabilities across graph nodes, given an initial set of known malicious nodes. We enhance prior work by employing constraints which remove the adverse effect of cyclic propagation that is a byproduct of current methods. We demonstrate the effectiveness of Probabilistic Threat Propagation on the task of detecting malicious web destinations.

An Expectation Maximization Approach to Detecting Compromised Remote Access Accounts(267.16 KB)

Date:
May 22, 2013
Published in:
Proceedings of FLAIRS 2013, St. Pete Beach, Fla.
Type:
Conference Paper

Summary

Just as credit-card companies are able to detect aberrant transactions on a customer’s credit card, it would be useful to have methods that could automatically detect when a user’s login credentials for Virtual Private Network (VPN) access have been compromised. We present here a novel method for detecting that a VPN account has been compromised, in a manner that bootstraps a model of the second unauthorized user.

Architecture-Independent Dynamic Information Flow Tracking(443.98 KB)

Date:
March 16, 2013
Published in:
Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Compiler Construction (CC 2013), Rome, Italy
Type:
Conference Paper

Summary

Dynamic information flow tracking is a well-known dynamic software analysis technique with a wide variety of applications that range from making systems more secure, to helping developers and analysts better understand the code that systems are executing. In this paper, we present a general approach to information flow tracking that allows us to support multiple ISAs without mastering the intricate details of each ISA we support, and without extensive verification.

Multifunction Phased Array Radar (MPAR) Spectral Usage Analysis(2.87 MB)

Date:
July 24, 2012
Published in:
Project Report ATC-395, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Type:
Project Report
Topic:

Summary

Two technical risks associated with replacing current air traffic and weather surveillance radars with a multifunction phased array radar (MPAR) are studied—radio spectrum usage and asynchronous operation across multiple antenna faces. The conclusions are (1) overall spectrum usage will likely increase with MPAR but still fit in the allocated S-band window, and (2) asynchronous operation is likely possible with coordinated scanning and dwell-time compensation.

Analysis of Ground-Based Radar Low-Altitude Wind-Shear Detection in OEP Terminal Airspace for NextGen(8.29 MB)

Author:
Date:
December 2, 2010
Published in:
Project Report ATC-375, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Type:
Project Report
Topic:

Summary

Low-altitude wind shear detection coverage is analyzed over 35 super-density terminal airspaces. Shortfalls are found for the current set of sensors with respect to the NextGen 4D Weather Cube Single Authoritative Source requirements, especially for horizontal resolution and vertical accuracy. Filling these gaps is expected to incur substantial cost through many additional sensors.

OEP Terminal and CONUS Weather Radar Coverage Gap Identification Analysis for NextGen(1.98 MB)

Author:
Date:
April 2, 2010
Published in:
Project Report ATC-369, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Type:
Project Report
Topic:

Summary

National Airspace System weather radar coverage is analyzed, with particular emphasis on 35 super-density terminal airspaces. It is found that the current radar network (or any future network of reasonable cost) will not meet NextGen 4D Weather Cube Single Authoritative Source requirements for vertical resolution, vertical accuracy, horizontal resolution, low-altitude coverage, and convective weather update rate.

Characteristics of Microbursts in the Continental United States (14.75 MB)

Date:
April 30, 1988
Published in:
Lincoln Laboratory Journal - Volume 1, Number 1
Type:
Journal Article
Topic:

Summary

Microbursts - powerful downdrafts generally associated with thunderstorms that occur in hot, humid weather - have caused a number of aircraft crashes. To prevent future accidents, air traffic controllers must be able to detect, and predict, microburst events. All microbursts are not alike, however; several distinct weather patterns can produce micro bursts. Thus a categorization of the different types of micro bursts is an essential part of understanding these hazardous phenomena Using this categoriza­tion, the relative hazard to aviation of the various types of micro bursts can be assessed.