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Robust Keys from Physical Unclonable Functions(633.75 KB)

Date:
May 4, 2014
Published in:
Proceedings of IEEE Symposium on Hardware-Oriented Security and Trust (HOST)
Type:
Conference Paper

Summary

Weak physical unclonable functions (PUFs) can instantiate read-proof hardware tokens where benign variation, such as changing temperature, yields a consistent key, but invasive attempts to learn the key destroy it. If some attack insufficiently changes the derived key, an expert must redesign the hardware. Our approach draws on machine learning. We propose a variant of linear discriminant analysis (LDA), called PUF LDA, which reduces noise levels in PUF instances while enhancing changes from known attacks.

Spectral subgraph detection with corrupt observations(228.35 KB)

Date:
May 4, 2014
Published in:
Proceedings of 2014 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Florence, Italy
Type:
Conference Paper

Summary

Recent work on signal detection in graph-based data focuses on classical detection when the signal and noise are both in the form of discrete entities and their relationships. The effects of imperfect observations add another layer of difficulty to the detection problem, beyond the effects of typical random fluctuations in the background graph. This paper analyzes the impact on detection performance of several error and corruption mechanisms for graph data.

Wind Information Requirements for NextGen Applications - Phase 2 Final Report(7.63 MB)

Date:
May 1, 2014
Published in:
Project Report ATC-418, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Type:
Project Report
Topic:

Summary

Accurate wind information is of fundamental importance to some of the critical future air traffic concepts envisioned under the FAA’s Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) initiative. In the first phase of this work, a Wind Information Analysis Framework was developed to help explore the relationship of wind information to NextGen application performance. A refined version of the framework has been developed for the Phase 2 work.

Adaptive Attacker Strategy Development Against Moving Target Cyber Defenses(525.83 KB)

Date:
April 16, 2014
Published in:
Proceedings of the 2014 ModSim World Conference
Type:
Conference Paper

Summary

A model of strategy formulation is used to study how an adaptive attacker learns to overcome a moving target cyber defense. The attacker-defender interaction is modeled as a game in which a defender deploys a temporal platform migration defense. Against this defense, a population of attackers develop strategies specifying the temporal ordering of resource investments that bring targeted zero-day exploits into existence. Attacker response to two defender temporal platform migration scheduling policies are examined.

Strategic Evolution of Adversaries Against Temporal Platform Diversity Active Cyber Defenses(421.3 KB)

Date:
April 13, 2014
Published in:
Proceedings of the Symposium on Agent Directed Simulation of the Society for Computer Simulation International
Type:
Conference Paper

Summary

Adversarial dynamics are a critical facet within the cyber security domain, in which there exists a co-evolution between attackers and defenders in any given threat scenario. While defenders leverage capabilities to minimize the potential impact of an attack, the adversary is simultaneously developing countermeasures to the observed defenses. In this study, we develop a set of tools to model the adaptive strategy formulation of an intelligent actor against an active cyber defensive system.

Finding Focus in the Blur of Moving-Target Techniques(1.08 MB)

Date:
April 1, 2014
Published in:
IEEE Security & Privacy, vol. 12, no. 2
Type:
Journal Article

Summary

Moving-target (MT) techniques seek to randomize system components to reduce the likelihood of a successful attack, add dynamics to a system to reduce the lifetime of an attack, and diversify otherwise homogeneous collections of systems to limit the damage of a large-scale attack. In this article, we review the five dominant domains of MT techniques, consider the advantages and weaknesses of each, and make recommendations for future research.

(Efficient) Universally Composable Oblivious Transfer Using a Minimal Number of Stateless Tokens(430.07 KB)

Date:
February 24, 2014
Published in:
Proceedings of Theory of Cryptography (TCC) 2014
Type:
Conference Paper
Topic:

Summary

We continue the line of work initiated by Katz (Eurocrypt 2007) on using tamper-proof hardware for universally composable secure computation. As our main result, we show an efficient oblivious-transfer (OT) protocol in which two parties each create and exchange a single, stateless token and can then run an unbounded number of OTs. Our result yields what we believe is the most practical and efficient known approach for oblivious transfer based on tamper-proof tokens, and implies that the parties can perform (repeated) secure computation of arbitrary functions without exchanging additional tokens.

Impossibility of Blind Signatures from One-Way Permutations(225.68 KB)

Date:
February 24, 2014
Published in:
Proceedings of Theory of Cryptography (TCC) 2014
Type:
Conference Paper
Topic:

Summary

A seminal result in cryptography is that signature schemes can be constructed (in a black-box fashion) from any one-way function. The minimal assumptions needed to construct blind signature schemes, however, have remained unclear. Here, we rule out black-box constructions of blind signature schemes from one-way functions. In fact, we rule out constructions even from a random permutation oracle, and our results hold even for blind signature schemes for 1-bit messages that achieve security only against honest-but-curious behavior.

Effective parallel computation of eigenpairs to detect anomalies in very large graphs

Date:
February 14, 2014
Published in:
SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing
Type:
Presentation
Topic:

Summary

The computational driver for an important class of graph analysis algorithms is the computation of leading eigenvectors of matrix representations of the graph. In this presentation, we discuss the challenges of calculating eigenvectors of modularity matrices derived from very large graphs (upwards of a billion vertices) and demonstrate the scaling properties of parallel eigensolvers when applied to these matrices.

Secondary Surveillance Phased Array Radar (SSPAR): Initial Feasibilty Study(6 MB)

Date:
February 6, 2014
Published in:
Project Report ATC-416, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Type:
Project Report
Topic:

Summary

A Secondary Surveillance Phased Array Radar (SSPAR) supporting terminal operations is described. Interrogation and receive techniques, antenna array configuration, signal processing, and preliminary performance are presented. SSPAR’s impact on spectrum congestion in the beacon radar band is analyzed, as are concepts for integrating SSPAR and next-generation primary radars to improve the efficiency and accuracy of aircraft and weather surveillance.