Adaptive Antennas and Phased Arrays

The 16 lectures in this course cover the topics of adaptive antennas and phased arrays. Both theory and experiments are covered in the lectures.

Part one (lectures 1 to 7) covers adaptive antennas. Part two (lectures 8 to 16) covers phased arrays. Parts one and two can be studied independently (in either order). The intended audience for this course is primarily practicing engineers and students in electrical engineering. This course is presented by Dr. Alan J. Fenn, senior staff member at MIT Lincoln Laboratory.

Course Description

Adaptive antennas and phased arrays, with rapidly scanned beams or multiple beams, are commonly suggested for radar and communications systems in ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne applications that must function in the presence of jamming and other sources of interference.

This lecture series begins with a discussion of the fundamentals of adaptive antennas pertaining to radar and communications systems, with an emphasis on consumption of adaptive array degrees of freedom from the jammer's viewpoint. Displaced phase center antenna array mutual coupling effects in the problem of adaptive suppression of radar clutter is discussed in Lecture 2. Next, in Lectures 3 through 5 a theoretical foundation for a focused near-field technique that can be used to quantify the far-field adaptive nulling performance of a large aperture adaptive phased array system is described. Simulations of focused near-field and focused far-field nulling performance for adaptive arrays are presented for arrays of isotropic elements in Lecture 3 and for arrays including mutual coupling effects in Lectures 4 and 5. Experimental testing of the focused near-field adaptive nulling technique for phased arrays is described in Lecture 6. An experimental high-resolution multiple-beam adaptive-nulling antenna system is described in Lecture 7.

Lectures 8 through 16 then concentrate on phased array antenna development for a variety of array elements. Lecture 8 provides an introduction to phased array antenna theory. In Lecture 9, finite and infinite array analyses and measurements for periodic phased arrays of monopole elements are presented. Lecture 10 describes the focused near-field polarization characteristics of monopole phased arrays as related to adaptive array testing in the near field. Next, in Lecture 11 a test bed phased array that implements the displaced phase center antenna technique, as related to the analysis presented in Lecture 2, is described along with the planar near field testing technique that is used to assess adaptive clutter cancellation performance. The planar near field scanning method for measuring low-sidelobe radiation patterns of phased arrays is described in Lecture 12. Experimental arrays of horizontally polarized loop-fed slotted cylinder antennas (Lecture 13), dual-polarized dipole arrays (Lecture 14), and ultrawideband dipole arrays (Lecture 15) are described. In Lecture 16, rectangular waveguide arrays are analyzed by the method of moments.

Lecturer - Dr. Alan J. Fenn

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List of Lectures


Disclaimer of Endorsement and Liability

The video courseware and accompanying viewgraphs presented on this server were prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and its Lincoln Laboratory, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, products, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government, any agency thereof, or any of their contractors or subcontractors or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and its Lincoln Laboratory.

The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof or any of their contractors or subcontractors.

Prerequisites for Course

Some background in signal processing, electromagnetic theory, antennas, radar, and communications will be helpful to the viewer.

Potential Viewers of Course

This series of lectures is intended for practicing antenna engineers and graduate students in electrical engineering.