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The JHU-MIT System Description for NIST SRE19 AV

Summary

This document represents the SRE19 AV submission by the team composed of JHU-CLSP, JHU-HLTCOE and MIT Lincoln Labs. All the developed systems for the audio and videoconditions consisted of Neural network embeddings with some flavor of PLDA/cosine back-end. Primary fusions obtained Actual DCF of 0.250 on SRE18 VAST eval, 0.183 on SRE19 AV dev audio, 0.140 on SRE19 AV dev video and 0.054 on SRE19AV multi-modal.
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Summary

This document represents the SRE19 AV submission by the team composed of JHU-CLSP, JHU-HLTCOE and MIT Lincoln Labs. All the developed systems for the audio and videoconditions consisted of Neural network embeddings with some flavor of PLDA/cosine back-end. Primary fusions obtained Actual DCF of 0.250 on SRE18 VAST eval, 0.183...

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State-of-the-art speaker recognition for telephone and video speech: the JHU-MIT submission for NIST SRE18

Summary

We present a condensed description of the joint effort of JHUCLSP, JHU-HLTCOE, MIT-LL., MIT CSAIL and LSE-EPITA for NIST SRE18. All the developed systems consisted of xvector/i-vector embeddings with some flavor of PLDA backend. Very deep x-vector architectures–Extended and Factorized TDNN, and ResNets– clearly outperformed shallower xvectors and i-vectors. The systems were tailored to the video (VAST) or to the telephone (CMN2) condition. The VAST data was challenging, yielding 4 times worse performance than other video based datasets like Speakers in the Wild. We were able to calibrate the VAST data with very few development trials by using careful adaptation and score normalization methods. The VAST primary fusion yielded EER=10.18% and Cprimary= 0.431. By improving calibration in post-eval, we reached Cprimary=0.369. In CMN2, we used unsupervised SPLDA adaptation based on agglomerative clustering and score normalization to correct the domain shift between English and Tunisian Arabic models. The CMN2 primary fusion yielded EER=4.5% and Cprimary=0.313. Extended TDNN x-vector was the best single system obtaining EER=11.1% and Cprimary=0.452 in VAST; and 4.95% and 0.354 in CMN2.
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Summary

We present a condensed description of the joint effort of JHUCLSP, JHU-HLTCOE, MIT-LL., MIT CSAIL and LSE-EPITA for NIST SRE18. All the developed systems consisted of xvector/i-vector embeddings with some flavor of PLDA backend. Very deep x-vector architectures–Extended and Factorized TDNN, and ResNets– clearly outperformed shallower xvectors and i-vectors. The...

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The MIT Lincoln Laboratory/JHU/EPITA-LSE LRE17 System

Summary

Competitive international language recognition evaluations have been hosted by NIST for over two decades. This paper describes the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MITLL) and Johns Hopkins University (JHU) submission for the recent 2017 NIST language recognition evaluation (LRE17) [1]. The MITLL/JHU LRE17 submission represents a collaboration between researchers at MITLL and JHU with multiple sub-systems reflecting a range of language recognition technologies including traditional MFCC/SDC i-vector systems, deep neural network (DNN) bottleneck feature based i-vector systems, state-of-the-art DNN x-vector systems and a sparse coding system. Each sub-systems uses the same backend processing for domain adaptation and score calibration. Multiple sub-systems were fused using a simple logistic regression ([2]) to create system combinations. The MITLL/JHU submissions were selected based on the top ranking combinations of up to 5 sub-systems using development data provided by NIST. The MITLL/JHU primary submitted systems attained a Cavg of 0.181 and 0.163 for the fixed and open conditions respectively. Post evaluation analysis revealed the importance of carefully partitioning for the development data, using augmented training data and using a condition dependent backend. Addressing these issues - including retraining the x-vector system with augmented data - yielded gains in performance of over 17%: a Cavg of 0.149 for the fixed condition and 0.132 for the open condition.
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Summary

Competitive international language recognition evaluations have been hosted by NIST for over two decades. This paper describes the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MITLL) and Johns Hopkins University (JHU) submission for the recent 2017 NIST language recognition evaluation (LRE17) [1]. The MITLL/JHU LRE17 submission represents a collaboration between researchers at MITLL and...

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