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High-throughput ingest of data provenance records in Accumulo

Published in:
HPEC 2016: IEEE Conf. on High Performance Extreme Computing, 13-15 September 2016.

Summary

Whole-system data provenance provides deep insight into the processing of data on a system, including detecting data integrity attacks. The downside to systems that collect whole-system data provenance is the sheer volume of data that is generated under many heavy workloads. In order to make provenance metadata useful, it must be stored somewhere where it can be queried. This problem becomes even more challenging when considering a network of provenance-aware machines all collecting this metadata. In this paper, we investigate the use of D4M and Accumulo to support high-throughput data ingest of whole-system provenance data. We find that we are able to ingest 3,970 graph components per second. Centrally storing the provenance metadata allows us to build systems that can detect and respond to data integrity attacks that are captured by the provenance system.
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Summary

Whole-system data provenance provides deep insight into the processing of data on a system, including detecting data integrity attacks. The downside to systems that collect whole-system data provenance is the sheer volume of data that is generated under many heavy workloads. In order to make provenance metadata useful, it must...

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High-throughput ingest of data provenance records in Accumulo

Published in:
HPEC 2016: IEEE Conf. on High Performance Extreme Computing, 13-15 September 2016.

Summary

Whole-system data provenance provides deep insight into the processing of data on a system, including detecting data integrity attacks. The downside to systems that collect whole-system data provenance is the sheer volume of data that is generated under many heavy workloads. In order to make provenance metadata useful, it must be stored somewhere where it can be queried. This problem becomes even more challenging when considering a network of provenance-aware machines all collecting this metadata. In this paper, we investigate the use of D4M and Accumulo to support high-throughput data ingest of whole-system provenance data. We find that we are able to ingest 3,970 graph components per second. Centrally storing the provenance metadata allows us to build systems that can detect and respond to data integrity attacks that are captured by the provenance system.
READ LESS

Summary

Whole-system data provenance provides deep insight into the processing of data on a system, including detecting data integrity attacks. The downside to systems that collect whole-system data provenance is the sheer volume of data that is generated under many heavy workloads. In order to make provenance metadata useful, it must...

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Recommender systems for the Department of Defense and intelligence community

Summary

Recommender systems, which selectively filter information for users, can hasten analysts' responses to complex events such as cyber attacks. Lincoln Laboratory's research on recommender systems may bring the capabilities of these systems to analysts in both the Department of Defense and intelligence community.
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Summary

Recommender systems, which selectively filter information for users, can hasten analysts' responses to complex events such as cyber attacks. Lincoln Laboratory's research on recommender systems may bring the capabilities of these systems to analysts in both the Department of Defense and intelligence community.

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Recommender systems for the Department of Defense and intelligence community

Summary

Recommender systems, which selectively filter information for users, can hasten analysts' responses to complex events such as cyber attacks. Lincoln Laboratory's research on recommender systems may bring the capabilities of these systems to analysts in both the Department of Defense and intelligence community.
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Summary

Recommender systems, which selectively filter information for users, can hasten analysts' responses to complex events such as cyber attacks. Lincoln Laboratory's research on recommender systems may bring the capabilities of these systems to analysts in both the Department of Defense and intelligence community.

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A survey of cryptographic approaches to securing big-data analytics in the cloud

Published in:
HPEC 2014: IEEE Conf. on High Performance Extreme Computing, 9-11 September 2014.

Summary

The growing demand for cloud computing motivates the need to study the security of data received, stored, processed, and transmitted by a cloud. In this paper, we present a framework for such a study. We introduce a cloud computing model that captures a rich class of big-data use-cases and allows reasoning about relevant threats and security goals. We then survey three cryptographic techniques - homomorphic encryption, verifiable computation, and multi-party computation - that can be used to achieve these goals. We describe the cryptographic techniques in the context of our cloud model and highlight the differences in performance cost associated with each.
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Summary

The growing demand for cloud computing motivates the need to study the security of data received, stored, processed, and transmitted by a cloud. In this paper, we present a framework for such a study. We introduce a cloud computing model that captures a rich class of big-data use-cases and allows...

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Computing on masked data: a high performance method for improving big data veracity

Published in:
HPEC 2014: IEEE Conf. on High Performance Extreme Computing, 9-11 September 2014.

Summary

The growing gap between data and users calls for innovative tools that address the challenges faced by big data volume, velocity and variety. Along with these standard three V's of big data, an emerging fourth "V" is veracity, which addresses the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data. Traditional cryptographic techniques that ensure the veracity of data can have overheads that are too large to apply to big data. This work introduces a new technique called Computing on Masked Data (CMD), which improves data veracity by allowing computations to be performed directly on masked data and ensuring that only authorized recipients can unmask the data. Using the sparse linear algebra of associative arrays, CMD can be performed with significantly less overhead than other approaches while still supporting a wide range of linear algebraic operations on the masked data. Databases with strong support of sparse operations, such as SciDB or Apache Accumulo, are ideally suited to this technique. Examples are shown for the application of CMD to a complex DNA matching algorithm and to database operations over social media data.
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Summary

The growing gap between data and users calls for innovative tools that address the challenges faced by big data volume, velocity and variety. Along with these standard three V's of big data, an emerging fourth "V" is veracity, which addresses the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data. Traditional cryptographic...

READ MORE

Computing on masked data: a high performance method for improving big data veracity

Published in:
HPEC 2014: IEEE Conf. on High Performance Extreme Computing, 9-11 September 2014.

Summary

The growing gap between data and users calls for innovative tools that address the challenges faced by big data volume, velocity and variety. Along with these standard three V's of big data, an emerging fourth "V" is veracity, which addresses the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data. Traditional cryptographic techniques that ensure the veracity of data can have overheads that are too large to apply to big data. This work introduces a new technique called Computing on Masked Data (CMD), which improves data veracity by allowing computations to be performed directly on masked data and ensuring that only authorized recipients can unmask the data. Using the sparse linear algebra of associative arrays, CMD can be performed with significantly less overhead than other approaches while still supporting a wide range of linear algebraic operations on the masked data. Databases with strong support of sparse operations, such as SciDB or Apache Accumulo, are ideally suited to this technique. Examples are shown for the application of CMD to a complex DNA matching algorithm and to database operations over social media data.
READ LESS

Summary

The growing gap between data and users calls for innovative tools that address the challenges faced by big data volume, velocity and variety. Along with these standard three V's of big data, an emerging fourth "V" is veracity, which addresses the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data. Traditional cryptographic...

READ MORE

A survey of cryptographic approaches to securing big-data analytics in the cloud

Published in:
HPEC 2014: IEEE Conf. on High Performance Extreme Computing, 9-11 September 2014.

Summary

The growing demand for cloud computing motivates the need to study the security of data received, stored, processed, and transmitted by a cloud. In this paper, we present a framework for such a study. We introduce a cloud computing model that captures a rich class of big-data use-cases and allows reasoning about relevant threats and security goals. We then survey three cryptographic techniques - homomorphic encryption, verifiable computation, and multi-party computation - that can be used to achieve these goals. We describe the cryptographic techniques in the context of our cloud model and highlight the differences in performance cost associated with each.
READ LESS

Summary

The growing demand for cloud computing motivates the need to study the security of data received, stored, processed, and transmitted by a cloud. In this paper, we present a framework for such a study. We introduce a cloud computing model that captures a rich class of big-data use-cases and allows...

READ MORE

Sparse matrix partitioning for parallel eigenanalysis of large static and dynamic graphs

Published in:
HPEC 2014: IEEE Conf. on High Performance Extreme Computing, 9-11 September 2014.

Summary

Numerous applications focus on the analysis of entities and the connections between them, and such data are naturally represented as graphs. In particular, the detection of a small subset of vertices with anomalous coordinated connectivity is of broad interest, for problems such as detecting strange traffic in a computer network or unknown communities in a social network. These problems become more difficult as the background graph grows larger and noisier and the coordination patterns become more subtle. In this paper, we discuss the computational challenges of a statistical framework designed to address this cross-mission challenge. The statistical framework is based on spectral analysis of the graph data, and three partitioning methods are evaluated for computing the principal eigenvector of the graph's residuals matrix. While a standard one-dimensional partitioning technique enables this computation for up to four billion vertices, the communication overhead prevents this method from being used for even larger graphs. Recent two-dimensional partitioning methods are shown to have much more favorable scaling properties. A data-dependent partitioning method, which has the best scaling performance, is also shown to improve computation time even as a graph changes over time, allowing amortization of the upfront cost.
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Summary

Numerous applications focus on the analysis of entities and the connections between them, and such data are naturally represented as graphs. In particular, the detection of a small subset of vertices with anomalous coordinated connectivity is of broad interest, for problems such as detecting strange traffic in a computer network...

READ MORE

D4M 2.0 Schema: a general purpose high performance schema for the Accumulo database

Summary

Non-traditional, relaxed consistency, triple store databases are the backbone of many web companies (e.g., Google Big Table, Amazon Dynamo, and Facebook Cassandra). The Apache Accumulo database is a high performance open source relaxed consistency database that is widely used for government applications. Obtaining the full benefits of Accumulo requires using novel schemas. The Dynamic Distributed Dimensional Data Model (D4M) [http://www.mit.edu/~kepner/D4M] provides a uniform mathematical framework based on associative arrays that encompasses both traditional (i.e., SQL) and non-traditional databases. For non-traditional databases D4M naturally leads to a general purpose schema that can be used to fully index and rapidly query every unique string in a dataset. The D4M 2.0 Schema has been applied with little or no customization to cyber, bioinformatics, scientific citation, free text, and social media data. The D4M 2.0 Schema is simple, requires minimal parsing, and achieves the highest published Accumulo ingest rates. The benefits of the D4M 2.0 Schema are independent of the D4M interface. Any interface to Accumulo can achieve these benefits by using the D4M 2.0 Schema.
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Summary

Non-traditional, relaxed consistency, triple store databases are the backbone of many web companies (e.g., Google Big Table, Amazon Dynamo, and Facebook Cassandra). The Apache Accumulo database is a high performance open source relaxed consistency database that is widely used for government applications. Obtaining the full benefits of Accumulo requires using...

READ MORE

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