Cyrus F. Hirjibehedin

Dr. Cyrus F. Hirjibehedin is a member of the technical staff in the Quantum Information and Integrated Nanosystems Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. He studies coupled superconducting quantum systems for applications in quantum information processing and quantum annealing.

Prior to joining MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Dr. Hirjibehedin was a professor of physics, chemistry, and nanotechnology at University College London (UCL), with affiliations in the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN), the Department of Physics & Astronomy, and the Department of Chemistry. His research at UCL focused on using scanning probe microscopy to understand the electronic and magnetic properties of nanometer-scale quantum structures and explore their potential applications in future paradigms of information processing, data storage, and sensing.

Before moving to UCL, Dr. Hirjibehedin was a postdoctoral research staff member at IBM's Almaden Research Center in the Low-Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Group. Working with Dr. Don Eigler and Dr. Andreas Heinrich, he studied the onset of cooperative magnetic behavior in atomically-precise low-dimensional structures. For his PhD research, Dr. Hirjibehedin worked with professor Aron Pinczuk at both Columbia University and Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies to explore novel interaction effects in low dimensional electron systems formed in semiconductor quantum structures.

Results from Dr. Hirjibehedin's work have been published in more than 40 papers in leading academic journals including Science, the Nature family, Physical Review Letters, Advanced Materials, and ACS Nano. He has also presented this work in more than 140 invited talks at international conferences and seminars, including plenary talks and colloquia, and has received a number of awards for performing high-impact research, including an Outstanding Innovation Award from IBM. Dr. Hirjibehedin was also a member of the Scientific Committee (international advisory board) for the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory at the University of Zaragoza in Spain, and has held honorary visiting positions at the Japan Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (JAIST), Harvard University, and Northeastern University.

Dr. Hirjibehedin holds a BS degree in both physics and computer science from Stanford University and a PhD degree in physics from Columbia University.